Frank Lloyd Wright has been declared America’s greatest architect of all time, yet his passion and talent penetrated far deeper than the facades of his buildings. In his quest to create harmony between exterior and interior environments, between landscapes and human inhabitants, Wright produced epoch-making designs across a broad spectrum of media, as well as influential writings, over the course of a career that spanned more than 70 years.
Wright designed the Peacock Chair in 1922 for the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo; his most well known project in Japan. The hotel famously survived the Great Kantō earthquake and the bombings of World War II, but was eventually demolished in 1968.

Luckily, elements of the interior live on. Wright’s Peacock Chair is held in the permanent collection of many museums around the world. This stunning exemplar features the original orange moleskin upholstery, which has two slight marks on the back sides of the chair.